What We Do

    SKILLS & EMPLOYMENT FOR WOMEN & GIRLS

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    SKILLS & ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT

    The LIUPCP has established a Socio-Economic Fund (SEF) grant facility. It is responsive to the community-led identification of actions. In addition to grant provision, SEF also offers will introduce a loan facility accessible to those above extreme poverty to ensure both social protection and social mobility. The SEF will be administered on a community contract basis following similar procedures to those of the
    Settlements Improvement Fund (SIF).

    • Develop detailed output implementation plans in response to the specific context of selected cities/ towns
    • In partnership with the private sector assess the medium-term skills gaps in participant cities / towns.
    • Identify training needs amongst the urban poor.
    • Develop agreements with the private sector to share the costs of training.
    • Identify the sources of training.
    • Assess and respond to illiteracy as a significant barrier to skills development.
    • Assess and respond to the skills development needs of people with disabilities.
    • Where possible and appropriate, work with established mechanisms on social impact investment and investors, identifying demand (employers’ needs) and supply (labour) side factors.
    • Provide, administer and monitor block grants.

    COMBATING VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN

     Develop detailed output implementation plans in response to the specific context of selected cities/towns.
    • Support the development of gender security audits.
    • Ensure action to combat violence against women is incorporated into CAP.
    • Provide training in legal provisions and rights on labour, family, housing and sexual and reproductive health.
    • Provide access to legal aid and other NGO and government services.
    • Identify and provide safe places for women and girls
    • Support establishing discussion forums on gender norms with men and boys.
    • Ensure Action and reporting on cases of violence.
    • Support the development of community-driven M&E systems to track basic and comparable indicators, and aimed at building ownership of PROJECT.
    • Provide, administer and monitor grants that prevent violence against women and girls.

    EDUCATION STIPENDS

    • Develop detailed output implementation plans in response to the specific context of selected cities / towns
    • Aim to limit the dropout rates of girls between primary and secondary education (and therefore curb early marriage) including offering cash transfers to extremely poor households with secondary school age girls (conditional on attendance at secondary school).
    • Leverage, augment or link with existing GOB stipend programmes mostly administered through schools.
    • Support regular awareness raising activities for adolescent boys, girls, men, women, local influential people, and government officials. Organize these through CDC (and CDC cluster) structures.
    • Develop and support community-driven M&E systems to track basic and comparable indicators, and aimed at building ownership of PROJECT.
    • Provide, administer and monitor grants that ensure regular education.

    NUTRITION

    The introduction of a nutrition supplementation support programme in urban areas under UPPR has had a notable impact in reducing levels of urban poverty measured through the multi-dimensional poverty index. There is a specific focus on the nutritional health of pregnant and breastfeeding women, adolescent girls and children under the age of five. The LIUPCP will improve nutrition for the urban poor by various interventions that include the following:

    • The LIUPCP nutrition component aims to improve the nutrition status of women (especially pregnant and lactating mothers), adolescent girls, boys, and young children (>2) from the PGs. It aims to do so through raising awareness at the community level and provides social protection through cash transfer, ensuring nutrition governance[1] at the city level, promoting collaborative action against malnutrition with relevant stakeholders.

    • LIUPCP will implement a nutrition education intervention composed of capacity building, counseling and behavior change communication campaigns and tools, as well as facilitating advocacy for change, and strengthening governance at the city-level to promote pro-poor urban nutrition services.

    • The LIUPCP perceives nutrition is an integral part of livelihoods outcome because it is co-dependent for livelihood security. Improving livelihoods address most of the causal factors that leads to malnutrition, as such improving livelihoods also result in improved nutrition. So, LIUPCP embraces nutrition intervention as part of resilience livelihoods.
    • Social protection through cash transfer to the target group (children during the first 1000 days of their development) provides a strong link between nutrition consumption and income (reduce health expenditure and burden). Nutrition governance[2], raising awareness on direct nutrition interventions (like IYCF and Hygiene, consumption of nutrient-rich, fortified foods and maternal nutrition), and collaboration and partnership-building, will be the central focus of the strategy.

    • The direct nutrition-specific interventions will focus on raising awareness on nutrition behavior, food hygiene (processing), breastfeeding, complementary feeding for under 2 children (children during the first 1000 days of their development), personal hygiene, consumption of diversified food etc. The target groups are women, lactating mothers, adolescent girls and boys as well as children from the PG. Broader multi-sectoral interventions target the root causes of undernutrition, such as inadequate income, food production, livelihood support by improving gender equality and girls’ education, which will have a powerful impact over time in preventing malnutrition. The nutrition intervention will also link with Component 5 (Resilience infrastructure), where improved water supply and sanitation are critical. Improved water supply and sanitation will address the cycle of disease and malnutrition, and will also help mothers to spend more time at household work that may help mothers to spend more time on nutrition and health of their children. The following diagram illustrates LIUPCP’s integrated approach to address undernutrition.

    • LIUPCP’s nutrition governance emphasizes the strong leadership of city and municipal authorities to manage all nutrition affairs at the city level. It comprises the mechanisms of nutrition service delivery, processes (coordination) and institutions through which community groups interact to articulate their interests and access to their legal rights.

    [1] The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), in its 1997 policy paper,3 defined governance as the exercise of economic, political and administrative authority to manage a country’s affairs at all levels. It comprises the mechanisms, processes and institutions through which citizens and groups articulate their interests, exercise their legal rights, meet their obligations and mediate their differences.

    [2] Nutrition governance emphasizes on strong leadership of city and municipal authority for managing all nutrition affairs at the city levels. It comprises the mechanisms of nutrition service delivery, processes (coordination) and institutions through which community groups interact to articulate their interests and access to their legal rights.